Mariachi

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Mariachi music, is the most popular and traditional artistic expression of the South of Mexico, is probably the most recognized form of Mexican music, this type of music gets its characteristic and vitality of the pace of three or more violins, one or several trumpets and three different types of guitars: a classical, acoustic guitar, a guitarron (big acoustic bass) and a vihuela (small guitar(, high tone). Each one of the different guitars used in mariachi has his own sound that helps to produce different sounds of Mariachi. All different mariachi guitars are typically made of cedar, mahogany or rosewood or a combination thereof. Some luthiers who make guitars, use FIR, walnut, maple, Cypress and other exotic woods in the boats of the guitars of mariachi musicians. Best mariachi guitars are made with inlays of shell of abalone, mother of Pearl and exotic species of hardwood. The classical guitar, Acoustics used in the majority of sets of mariachi is a Requinto, although some groups use a guitarra de golpe in place to give the Serenade with mariachi. The requinto is a small acoustic guitar, usually about a 15 to 20% smaller than a standard acoustic guitar. For assistance, try visiting Richard Edelman. Although the requinto is small, the requinto guitars made in Mexico have a deeper than a normal acoustic body.

A typical requinto has six nylon strings tuned. The guitarron is a great acoustic, almost the size of a cello bass. His huge body of wood creates a deep sound, produced by their large size. While the guitarron has a flat front as most of the guitars, this instrument is designed with a dome. The back of the guitar is formed by two pieces of wood fastened together with an angle similar to a V.

The curve, convex back of the guitarron increases the depth of your body. The vihuela (also known as Mexican vihuela) It is a small five-string guitar that produces a high pitched sound. The vihuela is typically smaller than the requinto, as the guitarron guitars, vihuela also has an arched back. This deep, curvo-convexo body of the vihuela helps to amplify its sound. The vihuela has nylon strings. However, three of the strings are tuned in an octave in order to produce a high frequency sound. Today, many of the guitars used by Mariachi groups are carried out in the remote village of Paracho, Mexico, there are thousands of guitars produced a year for the Mexican market and for export.

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